Category Archives: C#

SQL Server 2005 Full Text Searching at the Huntsville Alabama Code Camp

My third and final presentation for the Alabama Code Camp 6 is “Introduction to SQL Server Full Text Searching”. Here are the materials I’ll be using during the demo.

First, here is a PDF of the PowerPoint slides:

Full Text Search Power Points

Next, most of the demos used SQL statements. This PDF file has all of the SQL plus some associated notes.

Full Text Search Demo Scripts

Finally, I did a WPF project that demonstrated how to call a full text search query from a WPF Windows application. Annoyingly enough WordPress (who hosts my blog) won’t let me upload ZIP files, so I renamed the extension to pdf. After you download the file to your drive, remove the .pdf and put the zip extension back on, then it should expand all the source for you correctly. (Yes, I know, I really need to get a host server for binaries, one of these days I’ll get around to it, but for today…)

Source for WPF Demo

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An Early Christmas from Redmond

They’re here! Today Microsoft released Visual Studio 2008 RTM. If you have an MSDN subscription you can download today and start producing all those new .Net 3.5 applications.

Also released today via the connect.microsoft.com site is CTP 5 of SQL Server 2008. It’s my understanding in this CTP most of the features are working, except for clustering.

I can see I won’t be getting any sleep tonight.

Little Bobby Tables

I love this cartoon from xkcd, it really emphasizes why you need to screen your data inputs to protect against SQL Injection Attacks.

http://www.xkcd.com/327/

By the way, there’s a WebLog Awards going on right now, if you also enjoy xkcd give them a vote. http://2007.weblogawards.org/polls/best-comic-strip-1.php Hurry though, voting ends November 8th.

Code Camp Samples

Tomorrow, Saturday October 6th I will be presenting “Getting Started with Full Text Searching”. Here are the materials I’ll be using during the demo.

First, here is a PDF of the PowerPoint slides:

Full Text Search Power Points

Next, most of the demos used SQL statements. This PDF file has all of the SQL plus some associated notes.

Full Text Search Demo Scripts

Finally, I did a WPF project that demonstrated how to call a full text search query from a WPF Windows application. Annoyingly enough WordPress (who hosts my blog) won’t let me upload ZIP files, so I renamed the extension to pdf. After you download the file to your drive, remove the .pdf and put the zip extension back on, then it should expand all the source for you correctly. (Yes, I know, I really need to get a host server for binaries, one of these days I’ll get around to it, but for tonight…)

Source for WPF Demo

Arcane Fun Fridays

WHEW! All of this WPF / XAML sure has been a lot of fun. But I think it’s time to come up for air and see what else is happing out there in Dot Net land.

Alabama Code Camp is coming up in just a little over a week, Saturday October 6th to be exact. Still plenty of time to register and even just a bit of time if you want to get in on the Silverlight programming contest. First prize for that is a Zune! http://www.alabamacodecamp.com/home.html

devLink, the large conference for a cheap price comes up right afterward in Nashville, Friday and Saturday October 12th and 13th. http://www.devlink.net/ . You can tell I’ll be there, my name’s on the front page as a winner of a Barnes and Nobel gift card (look for the dude from AL !)

(By the way, anyone know of a good dog repellent? My nephew is coming to house sit and is bringing Marshmallow and Buttercup, his twin Dobermans along because I have a big back yard they can play in. Last time though they ate the garden hose, chewed the handle off my shovel, and bit through one of my lawnmower tires.)

There’s a new add-on for SQL Server Management Studio I’m eager to try out. It’s still in Beta but looks promising. It was blogged about at http://weblogs.sqlteam.com/mladenp/archive/2007/09/20/SSMS-Tools-Pack—an-add-in-for-SQL-Management-Studio.aspx or you can download it directly at http://www.ssmstoolspack.com/ .

If you are a fan of NUnit, you’ll appreciate the new xUnit. Read James’ announcement at http://jamesnewkirk.typepad.com/posts/2007/09/announcing-xuni.html .

In a recent Dot Net Rocks episode, Carl Franklin announced they would be taking over Shrinkster.com. Shrinkster has been down due to spam abuse, as soon as Carl gets everything setup we’ll be able to go back to using short links again!

Speaking of Dot Net Rocks, I especially enjoyed show 274, where the new features of VB.Net and C# for the 2008 release were discussed. Entertaining and lots of good tidbits. I think my favorite feature so far has got to be C#’s extension methods. http://www.dotnetrocks.com/default.aspx?showNum=274

During my long drive to the Tallahassee Code Camp last week, I put together a podcast theme session, and copied a bunch of related podcasts onto my cheapo SanDisk mp3 player. This time I went with a “Millenator” theme and got all the episodes of Dot Net Rocks that Mark Miller appeared on. Good stuff, lots of thoughtful material combined with some humor. Next time you go on a trip, copy a bunch of past episodes of your favorite podcast that are in the same theme and make that long drive go much quicker.

There have been several updates to the world’s greatest Visual Studio Add-In, CodeRush, over the last few weeks ( http://www.devexpress.com/Home/Announces/CodeRush25.xml ). Apparently Mark Miller and the boys have been busy! If you’re not on 2.5.4 go update yours today.

Speaking of Mark Miller, I love his intro slide for his VSLive session coming up in LasVegas. Take a look, pure genius. http://www.doitwith.net/2007/09/11/MyLastVSLiveSessionEver.aspx

A final note, between getting ready for Alabama Code Camp and going to devLink my blogging may get spotty for the next few weeks, bear with me and I’ll have full reports from both code camps and lots of fun new stuff to share.

WPF Menus

The next control in the basic toolkit is the menu. Menus are much like a series of nested buttons in the way you deal with them. Let’s create a simple menu. I’ve added a DockPanel, so we could nest our menu at the top, a very common scenario.

  <DockPanel>

    <Menu DockPanel.Dock=Top >

      <MenuItem Header=_File>

        <MenuItem Header=_Open />

        <MenuItem Header=_Save />

        <MenuItem Header=Save As… />

        <MenuItem Header=E_xit Click=mnuFileExit_Click />

      </MenuItem>

      <MenuItem Header=_Edit>

        <MenuItem Header=_Cut />

        <MenuItem Header=C_opy />

        <MenuItem Header=_Paste />

      </MenuItem>

      <MenuItem Header=_Help>

        <MenuItem Header=_About />

        <MenuItem Header=_Contents />

        <MenuItem Header=_Help />

      </MenuItem>

    </Menu>

  </DockPanel>

wpf054

The underscore acts as an indicator to underline in the menu, designating a “hot key”. When the user hits the ALT key, they are then able to combine with the hot key to activate the menu option. ALT+F opens the File menu, O will then trigger the open.

Responding to the users click is just like working with many other controls, simply add a Click=”” in the MenuItem. Above you will notice I did this for one item, the Exit menu choice under File. Here’s the code I created in C#:

    void mnuFileExit_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)

    {

      this.Close();

    }

Since all the other menus work the same way I won’t bother to wire them up, but you get the idea.

It’s also possible to insert a separator, a visual line the separates one menu option from the rest. In this example, I think Exit should be separated from the other options.

  <!– …snip… –>

  <MenuItem Header=_File>

    <MenuItem Header=_Open />

    <MenuItem Header=_Save />

    <MenuItem Header=Save As… />

    <Separator></Separator>

    <MenuItem Header=E_xit Click=mnuFileExit_Click />

  </MenuItem>

  <!– …snip… –>

And now we have a nice clean line across the menu:

wpf055

OK, I can hear you now, “Hey, this is WPF, what about all the pretty pictures?” No problem, the menus support the addition of icons to each item.

One thing I’ve found many developers don’t realize is that Visual Studio actually ships with a nice array of graphics for your use. If you are using Visual Studio 2005, navigate to the C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 8\Common7\VS2005ImageLibrary folder. There you will find a zip file named VS2005ImageLibrary.zip.

I extracted the icons folders to my D drive, as you’ll notice in the next code snippet. Adjust the sample according to where you decide to put them. I did find that on Vista, I needed to move them out of my Program Files folder or they didn’t render correctly, a security permissions issue.

      <MenuItem Header=_File>

        <MenuItem Header=_Open >

          <MenuItem.Icon>

            <Image Height=16 Width=16

              Source=D:\Icons\WinXP\folderopen.ico />

          </MenuItem.Icon>

        </MenuItem>

        <MenuItem Header=_Save >

          <MenuItem.Icon>

            <Image Height=16 Width=16

              Source=D:\Icons\Win9x\DISK06.ico />

          </MenuItem.Icon>

        </MenuItem>

        <MenuItem Header=Save As… />

        <Separator></Separator>

        <MenuItem Header=E_xit Click=mnuFileExit_Click />

      </MenuItem>

For the MenuItems I wanted to add icons to, I need to define the MenuItem.Icon tag, then inside place an Image. The Source property I set to files I’d mentioned earlier. Note also I explicitly set the Height and Width to 16×16, in order to make them fit nicely into the menu. However, you are free to make them any size you wish, the menu item height will adjust automatically to compensate.

wpf056

Ah, a work of art even Leonardo da Vinci would be proud of. But our artistic menus are not limited to the the top of the Window. It’s also possible to attach a menu to nearly any control, in the form of a ContextMenu. ContextMenus appear when you Right Click with the mouse on the control.

  <DockPanel>

    <Menu>

    <!–Menu omittied for brevity, same as previous–>

    </Menu>

    <Grid>

      <Grid.RowDefinitions>

        <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>

        <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>

      </Grid.RowDefinitions>

      <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

        <ColumnDefinition></ColumnDefinition>

        <ColumnDefinition></ColumnDefinition>

      </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

      <TextBlock Grid.Row=0

                Grid.Column=0

                Grid.ColumnSpan=2>

        Enter some text, right click for menu options.

      </TextBlock>

      <TextBox Grid.Row=1 Grid.Column=0>

        <TextBox.ContextMenu>

          <ContextMenu>

            <MenuItem Header=_Cut />

            <MenuItem Header=C_opy />

            <MenuItem Header=_Paste />

            <Separator></Separator>

            <MenuItem Header=_Save >

              <MenuItem.Icon>

                <Image Height=16 Width=16

                  Source=D:\Icons\Win9x\DISK06.ico />

              </MenuItem.Icon>

            </MenuItem>

          </ContextMenu>

        </TextBox.ContextMenu>

      </TextBox>

    </Grid>

  </DockPanel>

I’m adding a Grid to the body of the DockPanel. In the Grid I’m putting a TextBlock with some instructions, then a TextBox. Try right clicking on the TextBox, and take a look at what you get:

wpf057

To get this to work, I first had to create a ContextMenu tag specific for the control, in this case TextBox.ContextMenu. Within that tag I was then able to place my ContextMenu. Inside it I treated it just like a normal Menu control, the code in there I simply copied from the other menus. I could even have the Click events route to the same code in the code behind module if I wished.

It’s worth pointing out that a menu may appear anywhere on the Window. Here I will create a menu to the right of the TextBox, in the next column of the Grid.

  <DockPanel>

    <Menu DockPanel.Dock=Top >

      <!–Omitted, see previous–>

    </Menu>

    <Grid>

      <!–Omitted, see previous–>

      <TextBox Grid.Row=1 Grid.Column=0>

        <!–Omitted, see previous–>

      </TextBox>

      <Menu Grid.Row=1 Grid.Column=1>

        <MenuItem Header=Load>

          <MenuItem Header=From File></MenuItem>

          <MenuItem Header=From Database></MenuItem>

        </MenuItem>

        <MenuItem Header=Reset>

          <MenuItem Header=This Item />

          <MenuItem Header=Entire Form />

        </MenuItem>

      </Menu>

    </Grid>

  </DockPanel>

wpf058

The menu code is the same as before, except I located in the Grid instead of at the top of the Window.

Virtually any application of decent size will need to employ a menu structure of some kind. Getting to know the basics of menu controls will get you ready for that first big WPF app.

WPF Tab Control

Continuing the series on visual grouping controls in WPF, the Tab control is a common UI element that has been around for some time. It makes a convenient way to organize your window when there is more than could realistically fit and still be comprehensible.

In WPF, Tabs are very easy to implement. Create a new WPF Window, remove the default Grid tags, and add the following XAML:  

  <TabControl>

    <TabItem Header=Tab 1>Here’s Tab 1</TabItem>

    <TabItem Header=2nd Tab>A second Tab</TabItem>

  </TabControl>

Run the app, and you’ll see the two tabs on a window:

wpf042

The TabItem, just like most controls, can hold a container control that can hold much more, thus making the tab really useful. In this example, let’s add a third tab item, with a grid. We’ll put in a few text boxes and a button.

  <TabControl Name=tabMyTabs >

    <TabItem Header=Tab 1>Here’s Tab 1</TabItem>

    <TabItem Header=2nd Tab>A second Tab</TabItem>

    <TabItem Header=Cool Tab>

      <Grid>

        <Grid.RowDefinitions>

          <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>

          <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>

          <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>

        </Grid.RowDefinitions>

        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

          <ColumnDefinition Width=*></ColumnDefinition>

          <ColumnDefinition Width=2*></ColumnDefinition>

        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

        <Label Grid.Column=0 Grid.Row=0

              HorizontalAlignment=Right>

          First Name:

        </Label>

        <Label Grid.Column=0 Grid.Row=1

              HorizontalAlignment=Right>

          Last Name:

        </Label>

        <TextBox Name=FirstName

                Grid.Column=1

                Grid.Row=0 />

        <TextBox Name=LastName

                Grid.Column=1

                Grid.Row=1 />

        <Button  Grid.Column=1

                Grid.Row=2

                Height=23 Width=75

                HorizontalAlignment=Left

                Name=CoolTabButton

                Click=CoolTabButton_Click

                VerticalAlignment=Top>

          OK

        </Button>

      </Grid>

    </TabItem>

  </TabControl>

Using techniques already described in my post on Grids (https://arcanecode.wordpress.com/2007/08/28/grid-yourself-its-wpf/ , in case you missed it) I was able to create a tab with some useful content. Running it, you can see the results for yourself:

wpf043

It’s also possible to determine the current tab via code. Let’s wire up a click event to that OK button you see. This requires we name the tab (I called it tabMyTabs), and the button, and add a Click=”CoolTabButton_Click” to the button declaration. Now all we have to do is add a little code:

    private void CoolTabButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)

    {

      TabItem ti = tabMyTabs.SelectedItem as TabItem;

      MessageBox.Show(“Tab Index=” + ti.Header);

    } 

 

Running and clicking on the OK button will result in a message box with the words “Tab Index=Cool Tab”

Granted my design won’t win any awards, but it gives you the general idea of how to use a tab control in WPF.