Category Archives: Microsoft

More WPF Resources

Walt Ritscher of Wintellect was in our offices this week, teaching us WPF. Great guy, really knows his stuff, and has a blog well worth checking out at

http://wpfwonderland.wordpress.com/

There’s a great training site on XAML/Silverlight called Nibbles. Be warned the site is done in Silverlight, so for now you’ll need to use IE and have Silverlight installed.

http://www.nibblestutorials.net/

Fellow southern blogger Keith Rome has a blog on WPF and Silverlight:

http://www.mindfusioncorp.com/weblog/

Tim Sneath has a lot of good info on Silverlight:

http://blogs.msdn.com/tims/default.aspx

Finally, this isn’t specifically a WPF resource, but our regional developer evangelist and all around swell guy Doug Turnure has a posting of .Net bloggers in Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi:

http://blogs.msdn.com/dougturn/archive/2007/08/19/most-popular-bloggers-in-georgia-alabama-and-mississippi.aspx

Update: September 15, 2007 – I wanted to add one more resource. I picked up Pro WPF by Matthew MacDonald (http://www.amazon.com/Pro-WPF-Windows-Presentation-Foundation/dp/1590597826/ref=pd_bbs_3/104-6226587-5048708?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1189884771&sr=8-3 or http://tinyurl.com/2pw8z9) I have several of Matthew’s books and have always enjoyed his writing, and this book appears to be another winner. It’s a good companion to the Adam Nathan book, as each book goes into some areas the other doesn’t.

Pro WPF

Tallahassee, FL Code Camp III

I’m pleased to announce I’ll be speaking at Tallahassee Code Camp III. The event takes place in Tallahassee Florida on Saturday, September 22nd. I’ll be speaking on SQL Server Compact Edition.

For more info, please visit their site at:

http://codecamp.tlhdotnet.net/

Hope to see you there!

Breaking news: Silverlight 1.0 Released!

Hot off the presses, Microsoft has released Silverlight 1.0! For those unfamiliar with Silverlight, it’s a lightweight add-in that works with most browsers. It allows you to display incredibly rich content in the browser. Version 1.0 uses AJAX libraries to handle multimedia content, games and more.

Read the Microsoft Press Release at:

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2007/sep07/09-04SilverlightPR.mspx

There is an interview with Scott Guthrie on Channel 9, you can see it here:

http://channel9.msdn.com/showpost.aspx?postid=339594

You can download Silverlight and learn more about it at the Silverlight site:

http://silverlight.net/Default.aspx

or the Microsoft page (slightly different content)

http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/

Scott Guthrie has a really informative post on his blog:

http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2007/09/04/silverlight-1-0-released-and-silverlight-for-linux-announced.aspx 

If you want to see an example of a Silverlight site, visit the Alabama Code Camp site at:

http://www.alabamacodecamp.com/home.html

Sweet.

New Customer Feedback Program at Microsoft

Microsoft has announced an exciting new initiative, a customer feedback program that allows folks like us to interact directly with the developers and let them know just how we feel. Rory Blyth wrote a really good post on the things that are wrong with Windows, and all I can say is “Amen and pass the crunchy peanut butter!” Read his post at http://www.neopoleon.com/home/blogs/neo/archive/2007/08/24/26758.aspx and see if you don’t feel like saying exactly the same thing.

Anyway, if you want to learn more about the new program from Microsoft, go to http://www.microsoft.com/emea/itsshowtime/sessionh.aspx?videoid=9999 and click the “See a Preview” link.

Rumor has it that Scott Hanselman, Microsoft’s newest employee will be the very first developer they will be trying this on.

Arcane Searching

I think we’d all agree the internet is one of the greatest productivity tools around, allowing us to find vast stores of information. I’m sure you’ve also heard it’s the greatest time waster, with lots of distracting sites or useless pages that get in the way of the results we want.

I find it really valuable to have a good search tool, one that focuses on the content I need, and limits the scope of the search to relevant areas. Of course we’ve all heard of Google, the 500 pound gorilla of search engines. While the do a pretty decent job, when your search phrase returns half a million hits it can be difficult to narrow down.

Recently I’ve found the Microsoft engine, Windows Live ( http://www.live.com/ ), has gotten a lot better, especially when looking for .Net related developer content.

My favorite so far though, is Search.Net ( http://searchdotnet.com/ ), a site put together by coding legend Dan Appleman. Dan ( http://www.desaware.com/ ) created a Google powered site, but maintains the list of sites it searches so you know that you are only combing sites devoted to programming and not Happy Harry’s House of Wild Women.

Another site I just learned about this week is Koders ( http://www.koders.com/ ). It’s a site devoted to searching through source code. It also has some helps that will let you zoom in on what you want. You can pick the language, or specify your search word needs to be in the class name, method name, or interface name. This kind of search is valuable when you are looking for an example, or trying to avoid reinventing the wheel.

A similar site is Krugle ( http://www.krugle.com/ ). It has similar paradigm to Koders, allowing you to search through code.

The final code search tool I’ll mention is Google’s new Code Search engine ( http://www.google.com/codesearch?hl=en ). It allows you to search using regular expression syntax, which is a nice feature (I just wish regular expressions weren’t such a pain in the underwear to use).

I have to give a quick thanks, most of these I learned about through either my listening of Dot Net Rocks ( http://www.dotnetrocks.com/ ) and HanselMinutes ( http://www.hanselminutes.com/ ) or through Scott Hanselman’s new forum site, which I blogged about yesterday.

Those are the list of place I go when I need to find something, how about you?

Arcane Links

Some miscellaneous topics to cover for today. First, I had the need to copy several thousand files from one machine to another, about 6 gigs worth. Explorer? No thanks, to slow and unreliable. Fortunately I had recalled reading a post on Scott Hanselman’s blog just the other day on this topic. http://www.hanselman.com/blog/XCopyConsideredHarmfulRobocopyOrXXCopyOrSyncBack.aspx

Since the machine I was using to do the copying was Vista, I used RoboCopy. Worked like a champ. The bad part was I didn’t even know I already had this tool until I’d read Scott’s post. Always nice when you go hunting for a tool only to discover you’ve already got it and it’s ready to go.


On the subject of SOA, Redmond Magazine released an article on Microsoft’s SOA strategy. http://redmondmag.com/features/article.asp?editorialsid=756

It was a long article and interesting, although it seemed to have an anti-Microsoft tone. I picked up a subtle, and perhaps condescending, knocking of Microsoft for not falling into lockstep with other industry players like IBM. While I do agree Microsoft sometimes comes a little late to the party, I don’t think it has to jump on the party boat to be an effective player in the industry.


Windows Communication Foundation Guru Jeff Barnes is planning on some new WCF posts in the near future, so be sure to keep an eye on his site if you play in the WCF realm. http://jeffbarnes.net/portal/blogs/jeff_barnes/archive/2007/08/08/coming-soon-wcf-3-5-posting-blitz.aspx

Jeff’s also working on a WCF Site (http://jeffbarnes.net/portal/blogs/jeff_barnes/archive/2007/08/06/planning-a-wcf-community-site.aspx), another good reason to keep an eye on his blog.


Finally, Scott Hanselman has opened up a forum area on his site, some good info and discussions can be found here. http://www.hanselman.com/forum/

Microsoft Goes Open Source

For years critics have been blasting Microsoft over their proprietary standards and applications. Over the last few years, however, Microsoft has slowly been answering those critics by adopting internet standards instead of insisting on their own, and releasing more things to the community.

The ability to save Office 2007 documents as XPS comes to mind, as does the ability for CardSpace to use open standards like OpenID. Now, in their next step they are embracing the open source community through the addition of a new Open Source page within Microsoft.

http://www.microsoft.com/opensource/default.mspx

On this site you can find all sorts of information and resources for those wanting to do open source projects using Microsoft software. Links to articles, websites, and the Visual Studio Express editions can be found. I won’t try to reiterate the entire site here, but if you have an interest in Open Source it’s well worth your time to have a look.

In addition is another site called Port 25. It is the outreach site for Microsoft’s Open Source Software Lab. Some really cool stuff here on Linux interoperability, as well as the new Dynamic Language support such as IronRuby and IronPython.

http://port25.technet.com/

I can tell right now I’m going to be spending a lot of time on Port 25.

Finally, I should mention a site that’s been around for a bit by the name of CodePlex. It’s Microsoft’s site to host open source project done by both Microsoft folks and those of us in the community. (Well, I say us, one day I keep swearing I’ll find time to crank out some cool project and put it on CodePlex.)

http://www.codeplex.com/

Currently they show about 2000 projects right now, so there should be a lot for you to check out.

No, I don’t foresee Vista going open source anytime soon. But I really have to hand it to Microsoft. Somewhere over the last few years they realized they weren’t the only game in town. Since then they have really made an effort to “play nice” with other communities, and embrace many new open standards. The creation of their Microsoft Open Source site is just another step in that journey.