Category Archives: macOS

Supressing “The certificate Couldn’t Be Verified” message Using the Microsoft Remote Desktop Application on Apple macOS

Introduction

In my previous blog post, Using the Microsoft Remote Desktop Application on Apple MacOS, I showed how easy it is to connect to one of your Windows computers from your Mac.

I frequently use the Microsoft Remote Desktop application on my Apple MacBook Pro to connect to one of my Windows computers. It presents a nice interface that’s easy to use and setup.

Once you’ve added your computer to the Microsoft Remote Desktop application (you’ll find the instructions in my previous post), all you have to do is double click on it to access your remote computer.

Here is the launching point, note that for security reasons in all of the images in this article I’ve blurred out the name of my computer and replaced it with <name>.

There is one irritating behavior. When connecting to a computer it frequently displays the following message: “You are connecting to the RDP host <name>. The certificate couldn’t be verified back to a root certificate. Your connection may not be secure. Do you want to continue?

Having to stop every time and click Continue is really annoying. Especially if you are on your home network, connecting to a computer you own and trust. There’s an easy fix though!

Suppressing the Warning Message

Simply click the Show Certificate button to display the certificate information.

Once you review, simply put a check mark in the “Always trust...” checkbox (pointed to by the arrow) then click Continue.

Since you are changing the trust certificates for your MacBook (or other Apple Mac computer, like the Mac Mini), macOS will prompt you to enter your admin password. Do so, then continue.

From here on out, all you need to do to connect to your remote computer is double click on it, and (if you’ve not saved it within the remote desktop program) enter your credentials. No more having to click to continue past the “certificate couldn’t be verified” message.

Conclusion

I’ll wrap this up with two quick notes. First, this works on the last several versions of macOS including Big Sur.

Second, while I’ve used Windows as the example, this will work with any OS (such as various Linux distros) that support RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol). Sadly, macOS does not support RDP so you cannot connect to another Mac from the Microsoft Remote Desktop application.

Closing All Finder Windows at Once in Apple macOS

It’s not uncommon for me to have multiple Finder windows open at once on my Mac. Often I’m cleaning up my drive, moving files from downloads to where I want them.

When I’m done, I naturally want to close all my Finder windows. Normally, if you go to the File menu in Finder, you’ll see an option to close the current window.

It can be annoying, and potentially time-consuming to go to every Finder window and close it. Even if I close using the red X button, I still have to go to each Finder window. It’d be nice to just close them all at once.

This is yet another instance where the OPTION key will be our friend. Simply hold down the OPTION key and the menu option will update.

You can simply click Close All and all open Finder windows will be exited. Alternatively, you can also press CMD+OPTION+W on the keyboard and all your Finder windows will be closed.

As an added bonus, this not only works in Finder but with any application that allows you to have multiple copies of the program open. For example, I opened up multiple copies of BBEdit and using the OPTION key enabled the Close All Windows choice. Do note though, the shortcut key may vary with each application.

This technique works on Big Sur, Catalina, and other recent versions of Apple macOS.

Skip The Countdown When Shutting Down Apple macOS

I’m sure any macOS user knows how to shut down their Apple computer. Just go to the Apple menu in the upper left, click on it, and pick Shut Down…

Doing so pops up a dialog with a count down timer. You can skip the 60 second count down timer by clicking the Shut Down button.

It’s possible though to skip this dialog and shut down your Mac immediately. The trick to this is, as with my previous blog post, using the OPTION key.

With the above menu open, simply hold down the OPTION button. When you do the menu updates.

The change is very subtle, so look closely. The three periods after “Shut Down” disappear. Now when you click shut down, the shut down dialog is by-passed. Your macBook will now shut down immediately.

This technique works on Big Sur, Catalina, as well as several previous versions of macOS.

Moving A File in Apple macOS

I’ve been using Windows since version 2, before that MSDOS all the way back to the earliest version. Thus working in the Microsoft world is very comfortable to me. My earliest exposure to Microsoft was with GWBASIC running on a Radio Shack (Tandy) TRS-80 Model 1.

I’ve been regularly using various distros of Linux for at least five years, perhaps longer, before that I used various UNIX or UNIX based systems. One of the earliest was CP/M on my Commdore 128, or later AmigaOS.

macOS is relatively new to me, I bought my first Mac about 3 years ago. The macOS GUI is very different in terms of commands from Windows or Linux. There are many things that aren’t intuitive to someone coming from another platform. Even though they may seem easy to an experienced Apple user, they took me some time to figure out. I thought I’d spend a few blog post helping out others who are experienced computer users, but relatively new to macOS.

One that befuddled me at first was very simple, moving a file to a different folder. Turns out it’s fairly simple when you know how.

First, open Finder and go to the file you want to move. Right click and pick Copy.

Now go to the folder you want to move the file to. If you right click, you’ll see the Paste option you may have seen before.

Now here comes the secret. Press and hold the OPTION key. When you do, the menu will update.

While the OPTION key is being held down, the Paste option changes to Move Item Here. Click on it and the file will be moved.

As I stated before, this may seem normal to a long time Apple user, but having menus change by holding a key isn’t something normally done in Windows or most Linux distros. As a new macOS user, it never occurred to me to hold down the OPTION key.

Using the OPTION key can unlock all kinds of new menu options, as you will see in upcoming posts.

Note this technique works in Big Sur, Catalina, as well the last several versions of macOS before that.

Getting Started with PowerShell Core on Linux and macOS

My newest course, Getting Started with PowerShell Core on Linux and macOS, is now live on Pluralsight! This course is my eighteenth in a long line of Pluralsight courses.

I begin the course explaining the difference between PowerShell for Windows (version 5.1) and the all-new PowerShell Core (version 6.2 was used for this course), which works not only on Windows but on Linux and macOS as well. I then show how to install PowerShell Core, along with a few other key components such as Visual Studio Code, on both Linux and macOS.

Not familiar with PowerShell? No problem! I quickly cover the basics of PowerShell including cmdlets, the use of the pipeline, how to write functions, and how to put those functions in reusable scripts.

As if that weren’t enough, I show how to do some “cool things” with PowerShell Core, including working with Docker containers, SQL Server, and Azure.

For the course, I primarily used Ubuntu 19.04 and macOS Mojave. The code was also tested on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 18.10, as well as macOS High Sierra. In addition, I tested the Linux installs on a variety of distributions including CentOS, Manjaro, and more. The samples include markdown files with information on how to install on these other distributions.

All of the samples are included in the downloadable components of the course on Pluralsight. New with this course I have the samples also available on my GitHub site. As I move into the future the GitHub codebase will be updated with new samples and information.

Also included in the samples are several markdown files that have additional information not included in the course, such as setting VSCode on Windows to use PowerShell Core instead of Windows PowerShell 5.1 as the default terminal.

While you are up on my GitHub site be sure to check out the full list of repositories, I have a lot of examples on it, including some from previous courses such as my recent Reporting Services course. (For a full list of my courses just check out the About ArcaneCode page on this site.)

Note the sample file on Pluralsight will remain static, so if someone watches the course their samples will reflect what is in the course. For the latest updated samples see the GitHub site referenced above.

What? You don’t have a Pluralsight subscription yet? Well, no worries dear reader, just email me, free @ arcanetc.com and I can send you a code good for 30 days with which you can watch all 18 of my courses, plus anyone else’s course at Pluralsight.