Azure PowerShell PlaybooK: Azure SQL–Now on Pluralsight!

My latest course is now available on Pluralsight! It’s the Azure PowerShell Playbook: Azure SQL. If you aren’t familiar with Pluralsight’s Playbook format, they are fast past courses that are almost 100% demo driven. They are meant to be consumed quickly, my course is just one hour and four minutes long. Great lunchtime viewing!

This course shows you how to use PowerShell to manage and migrate your on premises database up to Azure SQL. In brief, you’ll learn how to:

  • Create resource groups
  • Create and work with Storage Accounts
  • Create a SQL Server in Azure SQL
  • Package up your local database into a bacpac file
  • Import your bacpac file into a new Azure SQL database
  • Execute commands against your new Azure SQL database
  • Cleanup! I even show how to remove everything you’ve created, individually or as a whole

And all of this with PowerShell!

Additionally, I’ve included functions for just about everything listed, so (assuming your subscription gives you access to the samples) you’ll have a great starting point for your own library of cmdlets. (All the code for the functions appears on screen, so if you have to you could always pause and type it in.)

You can find my new course at:

https://www.pluralsight.com/courses/azure-powershell-sql-playbook

I also wrote an article for RedGate’s SimpleTalk website that aligns well with this course. I dive deeper into the restartability aspect of the way the functions were coded, something I couldn’t get deep into with the video course due to time constraints.

https://www.red-gate.com/simple-talk/sysadmin/powershell/powershell-functions-reusability-restartability-azure/

What’s that? Yes you in the back row, you say you don’t have a Pluralsight subscription? Well no worries, just email me, free@arcanetc.com and I’ll be glad to send you a code that will be good for 30 days at Pluralsight. During that time you can watch my courses, indeed you can watch any course at Pluralsight.

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Mobile Report Publisher–Dashboards Everywhere

My latest article on RedGate’s SimpleTalk site has just come out: Mobile Report Publisher – Dashboards Everywhere.

In it, I give a quick overview of using SQL Server 2016’s Mobile Report Publisher to create a simple but useful dashboard. Mobile Report dashboards can be assembled easily, and quickly, from SSRS (SQL Server Reporting Services) Shared Datasets.

Reports generated with Mobile Report Publisher are great, as they can be used on, as the name suggests, mobile devices such as phones and tablets, but on websites as well. They fill the need between a traditional report and those analytic reports created by self service tools such PowerBI.

Using the instructions in my SimpleTalk article, you should be able to create your first, simple report. If that wets your appetite for more, I can offer two additional learning paths.

First, there’s my book SQL Server 2016 Report Services Cookbook. In it I have an entire chapter on the Mobile Report Publisher. Being an entire chapter I had more space to go deeper, and provide instructions on pulling data from multiple sources. I also go into the use of other components in the dashboard. You can find the book on both Amazon and my publisher, PactPub’s website.

The second resource is my Pluralsight course What’s New in SQL Server 2016 Reporting Services. The report gives a great overview of all the new features of SSRS 2016 (and still applicable to 2017). The bulk of the course focuses on the Mobile Report Publisher, but I also cover other new features such as the new Report Portal, and the ability to host KPIs right on the portal, among other features.

Don’t have a Pluralsight subscription? No worries, just email me, free@arcanetc.com and I can send you a code good for 30 days during which you can watch my courses, or any of the great courses at Pluralsight!

Opening Port 80 in Windows Firewall to Support Calling SSRS From Another Computer

Recently I was working on another article for RedGate’s SimpleTalk site. As part of it, I had SSRS installed on a Windows 10 computer, and needed to connect to it from another computer. I was having a lot of issues connecting, until I remembered SSRS connects using Port 80, and by default Windows 10 (and previous versions) block Port 80 for incoming traffic.

The solution was to, obviously, open Port 80 on the Windows 10 computer. Doing so was not difficult, but did require quite a few steps, and of course administrator rights on the computer.

First, open the Windows 10 Settings. Then, click on Network & Internet.

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On the Status window, click on Windows Firewall.

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From here, click on Advanced settings.

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If prompted confirm you do wish to make changes. When the Windows Defender Firewall dialog appears, click on Inbound Rules.

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Now click on New Rule

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In the New Inbound Rule Wizard window, change the type of rule to be Port. Then click next.

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On the next window, leave the rule applying to the default of TCP. For the port, assuming you are using the default setup, enter 80 for the port number. If you setup SSRS on a different port then obviously use that port number instead.

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On the action page we tell Windows what we want to do if it finds incoming traffic on this port. For this development environment we will take the default of Allow the connection. If you had setup https service on your report server, then you could take the second option of allow if secure.

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Next, we need to specify what network type the rule should apply to. For the scenario, I am on a small network, such as you might have at home, and that network was setup as private. Thus I am leaving Private checked on, and unchecking Domain and Public.

Unchecking public is especially important if you plan to take your laptop out to a coffee shop, you don’t want someone trying to hack into your machine via port 80. When done just click next.

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On the last screen we’ll give the firewall rule a name, and a description. When done, click finish.

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As you can see, the new rule now appears in our Inbound Rules area.

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Once you have completed working with your SSRS server, I’d suggest you return here, right click on the rule, and either disable it, or if you know it will no longer be needed, delete it.

And with that you should now be able to connect to the computer running SSRS from another computer on your network.