Converting (Remapping) Caps Lock to CTRL

ThinkpadKeyboardI’ve always been a fan of the Lenovo Thinkpad keyboards. The have a good feel, and I especially love the Trackpoint. The Trackpoint is that little red nub between G and H, and acts as a mouse. With it I can do many mouse activities without removing my hands from the keyboard. With most it is a love / hate thing, either they love it or the are mentally deficient and hate it.

I actually have two, one is the USB version which I have plugged into my KVM (Keyboard Video Monitor) switch. The other is a Bluetooth model I use with my Surface Pro 3 when I’m away from home. They are quiet, easy to hold in your lap, and take up very little desk space.

The only complaint I have is with the CTRL key, something we all hit many times a day. Its position makes it difficult to reach with my huge hands. Fortunately there is an easy fix: remapping the seldom used Caps Lock key to turn it into another CTRL key.

While there are many ways and apps to do this, by far the one I trust the most comes from Microsoft in the form of its SysInternals utility Ctrl2Cap v2.0. It’s dirt simple, just follow the instructions and after the next reboot your Caps Lock will function as a CTRL key.

While my Thinkpad keyboards were the reason I needed to do this, Ctrl2Cap will work with any keyboard. If you could use an extra CTRL key, give the utility a try.

Note, it doesn’t swap CTRL and Caps Lock, it just converts Caps Lock to CTRL. All of your existing CTRL keys will continue to work normally. Thus, if you do this, you’ll lose the ability to do Caps Lock. (Don’t say I didn’t warn you.) Not a big deal for me, I rarely “unleash the fury” as they say, needing to type in all caps. It’s not permanent either, if you want to reverse it, Ctrl2Cap has an easy to use uninstall option.

Hope this tip helps, if nothing else this post will help me in the future when I need to setup a new PC.

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IT ops and news talk–Episode 3 Secure that Jump Server

I owe everyone an apology, I missed blogging about this at the time it occurred. Last December I was a guest on Don Box’s podcast, “IT ops and news talk”. I appeared on Episode 3, Secure that Jump Server.

In the podcast we discuss the testing of PowerShell code with Pester. After that we got into an interesting discussion on the current state of DevOps. Give it a listen I think you’ll enjoy, it’s about half an hour in length. Don is a great interviewer it was a lot of fun.

As a follow on to the discussion, you might want to learn more about Pester. I have a complete course on the subject in my Pluralsight course Testing PowerShell with Pester. If you don’t know anything about PowerShell, but want to learn, then I’d suggest my Beginning PowerShell Scripting for Developers. Note that even though it says “…for Developers” we don’t mean programmers (although it could), instead it refers to people who wish to develop scripts in PowerShell.

What? What was that? You in the back row waving your hand? You say you don’t have a Pluralsight subscription? Hey, no problem. Just email me, free <at> arcanetc.com and I can send you a code good for 30 days of free access to Pluralsight, with which you can watch not just my courses, but any course from Pluralsight’s library of over 5,000 courses.