Optimizing SQL Server Database Performance and Overcoming Unpredictable Challenges

This is a guest post from Tony Branson at ScaleArc.

With the explosion of digital data, achieving optimum database performance has become the primary concern of every database professional. For improving efficiency when managing a complex IT environment, DBAs must stay one step ahead consistently and learn about the best practices, proven strategies, and innovative approaches being applied to different DBA processes. Here are 5 key areas to consider for driving database efficiency even with an exponential increase in data:

1. Knowing What Needs Your Focus

It is important to have a good fundamental understanding of your IT infrastructure as a DBA. It’s critical to understand what’s working well and what’s not performing within the database infrastructure itself – e.g., if you’re having memory issues vs. I/O issues. It’s also critical that you understand how the database is reached – what network issues, application issues, VM issues could be impacting database availability or performance. Ensure your perspective is broad enough to understand the parts of the technology stack that need your attention.

2. Performing Periodic Health Checks

Database corruption hits without warning and has a devastating impact on your data if you are unprepared. Backups are essential but if you are backing up corrupt data, all your efforts are going down the drain. To prevent such a scenario it is important to perform health checks periodically using a standardized process. As a rule of thumb, DBAs should check and validate the consistency and integrity of a database frequently to make sure there is an accurate, valid backup always available in case the need arises.

3. Fine-tuning SQL Server Performance

The biggest challenge facing any DBA is how to improvise, optimize and maintain SQL Server database performance. When tuning a busy system, considering the full range of KPIs can get downright overwhelming. Use online guides to identify the metrics that actually matter and make improvements accordingly. For example, if you see a sudden fall in page life expectancy, it reflects an increase in your I/O requirements, which means you should be checking the processes running at that time.

4. Staying Compliant

Compliance can take a toll on compute resources, giving rise to on-going stress. While it may seem tempting to monitor every single transaction, it can kill your performance because it would need a large amount of storage space.

It is important to have an audit strategy in place with well-defined data and events before you can start. This approach will help you make any necessary adjustments over the time and track all the results for quarterly and annual audits.

5. Leveraging a Modern Database

The emergence of new generation applications that require both scale and speed to function at peak efficiency has exposed the flaws and gaps in existing database technologies. Scale up has reached full capacity, but scale out has historically been really tough. Modern databases support key features that can boost app performance and improve uptime, but taking advantage of these capabilities has required substantial application recoding.

Database load balancing software makes SQL Server management easy, avoiding the need for code changes to support features at the application tier. It enables geo-aware load balancing, supports app-transparent failover, transparently delivers read/write split, enables query routing, and performs multiplexing and connection pooling, enabling DBAs to tackle the challenges of an ever-growing pool of database servers. Deploying database load balancing lets you harness all the capabilities of SQL Server databases. By deploying database load balancing software, DBAs can efficiently address all the issues and problems that impact their ability to manage and optimize SQL Server databases effectively.

young man portrait, isolated on whiteAbout the author: A self-proclaimed tech geek, with a passion for ScaleArc’s disruptive technology innovation in database load balancing. Tony has a passion for dissecting tech topics such as transparent failover, centralized control, ACID compliance, database scalability and downtime effects. On his days off, he can be found watching sci-fi movies, rock climbing or volunteering.

Disclaimer: This post is not an advertisement. The owner of this blog has received no compensation for the placement of this guest post.

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