SSRS 2012 Report Manager can’t load Microsoft.ReportingServices.SharePoint.ObjectModel

So I did it again, I broke my SQL Server. Well, sort of. I have a Hyper-V VM of Windows Server 2012R2 I use for development. On it I had SQL Server 2012 Developer Edition with all the latest service packs. I recently needed to do some work with 2014 as well, so installed SQL Server 2014 Developer Edition side by side. Everything seemed happy, until I opened up the SQL Server 2012 Report Manager webpage. It looked OK at first, but when I started clicking on things I started getting this error:

System.Configuration.ConfigurationErrorsException: Could not load file or assembly ‘Microsoft.ReportingServices.SharePoint.ObjectModel’ or one of its dependencies. The located assembly’s manifest definition does not match the assembly reference

Icky. So a web search turned up one hit, a connect item filed by Brian Judge:

https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/1088671/sql-server-2012-reporting-services-errors-after-installing-sql-server-2014

At the bottom, Brian gives the clue on how to fix the issue when he says:

If I change the redirect to stay on 11.0.0.0 for the following policies then the problem appears to be resolved:

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_MSIL\Policy.11.0.Microsoft.ReportingServices.SharePoint.ObjectModel

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_MSIL\Policy.11.0.Microsoft.ReportingServices.SharePoint.Server

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_MSIL\Policy.11.0.Microsoft.ReportingServices.SharePoint12.Server

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_MSIL\Policy.11.0.Microsoft.ReportingServices.SharePoint14.Server

 

Alas, there are no specific instructions on just how to change the redirect. For those not familiar with the way these things work, I wanted to amplify his fix.

First, open a command window in administrator mode. I used the one that came with Visual Studio (the Developer Command Prompt for VS2012).

Next, change directory by using the “cd” command to the first item in the list above. (Click on the pic for a bigger image, should you have poor eyesight).

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Using the DIR command, we can see one directory with a version number followed by what appears to be a hash value of some type. Issue another CD into that folder.

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Using the DIR command again you will find two files in that folder:

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Use notepad to edit the one with the .config extenstion.

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When it appears, you will see something like:

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Simply change the number in the newVersion from 12, to 11.

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Repeat the steps for all four of the folders in the list above.

Next, and this is important kids, you need to stop and restart your SQL Server 2012 Reporting Services service, or simply reboot the computer. After that, your SSRS 2012 Report Manager should start to behave normally again. I’ve also tested the 2014 Report Manager, and it seems to work fine after the changes were applied. (In theory it shouldn’t have been affected, but you can never be too careful).

If you found this post useful, do us a favor. Go to the Microsoft Connect article linked at the top and give it an up vote, so Microsoft will begin to take notice. Also thanks again to Brian Judge (whom I do not know but hope to meet) for filing the original bug and giving the clue to fixing it.

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So You Think MDX is Hard? Presented at SQL Saturday Nashville Jan 17 2015

At SQL Saturday Nashville, on January 17 2015, I presented “So You Think MDX is Hard?”. Unfortunately the SQL Saturday website is having issues with code samples, so I have uploaded the presentation to my Technet Code site. You will find it at http://bit.ly/acmdx

Inside are three files, a PDF of the slide deck, the MDX script I ran, and the analysis services database as a backup file (abf) that you can restore to a server on which you have administrative rights. This sample was created in SQL Server 2012, although should work on 2014 and (although I haven’t tested) should work on 2008R2.

SQL Server SSIS SSDT Error – Method Not Found: Microsoft.SqlServer.Dts.Design.VisualStudio2012Utils.IsVisualStudio2012ProInstalled

Every so often, especially when setting up a new virtual machine, at some point I get this error when working in SSIS:

 

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It happens often enough that, to be honest, I mostly wanted to make this as a record to myself and friends, but I am hopeful that you will be helped as well. And to give credit where it is due, I found the original answer at Stack Exchange:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/24745396/isvisualstudio2012proinstalled-method-not-found-error-when-running-an-ssis-pac

The steps are pretty straight forward.

1.  First, if you have Visual Studio open, close it.

2. In the classic Windows menu go to Start, All Programs, Microsoft Visual Studio 2012, Visual Studio Tools, and right click on the “Developer Command Prompt for VS2012” and pick “Run as administrator”. If you are in Windows 8 or Server 2012 or later, probably easiest to just do a search for “Developer Command Prompt for VS2012”.

3. Navigate to Visual Studio’s Private Assemblies folder by entering “CD C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\PrivateAssemblies”  (If you have installed VS to another drive or folder, adjust the path accordingly).

4. Enter the command “gacutil /if Microsoft.SqlServer.Dts.Design.dll” into the command prompt.

 

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Now you should be able to open your SSIS projects.

The dll is the main set of libraries for SQL Server Integration Services. For some reason, after certain Windows updates, this becomes deregistered and you have to manually add it back. Not a huge deal, but annoying if it happens often enough. As I just had it happen today after a Windows update to the Hyper-V VM I use for some of my SQL Server development, I wanted to post this as a reminder on how to correctly fix the issue.