Make Your SSAS Data Source View Pretty

Anyone who works with SSAS (SQL Server Analysis Services) knows the DSV (Data Source View) is the key to the project. It is through the DSV that everything else is built on. Unfortunately, in most projects I’ve worked on, it is generally the biggest mess.

Take this simple example cube based on the Adventure Works data warehouse.

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What a mess! Fortunately there is a very simple way to clean it up.

Go up to the toolbar area. Right click to bring up a list of available toolbars, and pick the Layout.

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Now you see a new toolbar appear:

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Hover your mouse over each item, you’ll see tool tips such as Left Alight, Right Alight, Align Tops, and more. Note that in the menus there is a menu named Format. The same items on the toolbar also appear in the menu. I find it a little easier to use the toolbar, but do what you are comfortable with.

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OK, now that we have our tools ready, we can start cleaning up that messy DSV. There are two ways to select the tables (or views) that we want fix up. First, you can simply click in an empty area of the design surface and drag the mouse. A little dotted line outline will appear showing you which tables will be in the selection.

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The other option is to click on the first table, what is known as the “reference”. You’ll know the reference because it has white border handles. Then CTRL+Click on the other tables you wish to align, or make the same size as, the reference table. You’ll know these because they have a thick black square on the sides and border.

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Now go to the layout bar or the menu, and find the button for align lefts. Click, then click the button for make same width. Repeat the process for the other tables in the DSV. When you are done it could look this pretty:

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With just a few minutes work your DSV is now organized into neat rows and columns of uniform width. This makes it much easier to read. Your eye is not distracted by the jagged alignment and the uneven widths. Instead, you can much more easily focus on the text inside the boxes, which is after all the important part.

One last tip, if you wish to move the selected table (or tables) a bit, hold down the CTRL key, then use the arrows to move everything in tiny steps to the position you want.

I did the above example using SQL Server 2008R2 BIDS, this technique also works with the SQL Server Data Tools that shipped with SQL Server 2012 (SSDT, aka Visual Studio 2010) and with the newer SSDT for Visual Studio 2012.

SSAS Duplicate Attribute Error – Another Cause

I had  a real head banger this afternoon and I’m not talking about the heavy metal playlist I was jamming to in my iPod.

I had a table that, in addition to the surrogate key, business keys, etc had these columns:

Level1 Level2
Phineas and Ferb Phineas
Phineas and Ferb Ferb
Phineas and Ferb Perry

I had a dimension in SSAS where I had a Level1 -> Level2 Hierarchy built. When I tried to process the dimension, SSAS kept kicking out “duplicate attribute error” on Perry. I did the usual checking, yes my attribute relationships were OK, the Key property was built correctly, etc.

So then I moved to look at the data itself. I first did a SELECT * FROM CoolShow WHERE Level1 = ‘Phineas and Ferb’ and Level2 = ‘Perry’.

I got back 4 rows. Hmm. After some more head banging (Guns ‘n Roses, Paradise City) I wound up doing a SELECT * FROM CoolShow WHERE Level1 = ‘Phineas and Ferb’ and I get back 42 rows with Perry. Hmm, I say to myself, “self, that looks odd”. To which self replied “duh”.

Then self suggested I do a SELECT ‘*’ + Level2 + ‘*’ FROM CoolShow WHERE Level1 = ‘Phineas and Feb’

This yielded some interesting results, 4 rows read *Perry* the other rows read *Perry *   (Note the blank space between y and * .)

Well obviously I needed a RTRIM, which I dutifully added then reran the query. Only to get the *Perry * again in the output. At this point self said I was on my own and abandoned me to drown its sorrows in a pitcher of margaritas.

I took the output and copied it into an editor that would do hex mode. So what do I see but a 0D 0A in the space between the y and the *, causing me to scream “AH-HA” as Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody hit its crescendo. I also scared the cat, but I only mention that because cute cat things are supposed to be popular on the internet and I figure it might help my SEO. For those who don’t speak HEX, 0D 0A is 13 and 10, which turn into a Carriage Return and Line Feed.

Now by this point most of you have probably given up on this handy tip, deciding a pitcher of margaritas sounded pretty good and left to find some. But if you are still hanging in, I modified the view with this code:

RTRIM(REPLACE(REPLACE([Level2], CHAR(13), ”), CHAR(10), ”) ) AS [Level2]

Returning to the cube I was able to process the dimension successfully and answer the question of “Where’s Perry?” (Answer: He’s at the bar trying to keep a drunken self from using his evil margaritainator invention.)

So the moral of the story, if you get duplicates error, and your dimension looks okey-dokey, check the data to see if you have some errant CR/LFs. Apparently SSAS doesn’t handle them very well.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to join self at the bar before self guzzles all the margaritas (self is such a drunken sot). AC/DC, take me away with some “Highway to Hell”!

SSAS Training Resources

I’ve been asked to provide links to some useful resources for learning about SQL Server Analysis Services. Below are a list of my favorite blogs, books, and other sites to learn from.

A quick disclaimer, some of the links below are by co-workers or other people I have an affiliation with, financial or otherwise. That’s because I’m lucky enough to work with some of the best people in the field. Also, in the case of the books I’ve linked to the Kindle version where possible, mostly because I’m a Kindle junkie. There are paper versions of the books, and you are free to buy from your favorite retailer.

Books

Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services Step by Step – This is a great beginners book. If you are starting at ground zero, this is the book to start with.

Professional Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services 2008 with MDX – If you are looking for one book that has everything, this is it. It’s a huge book that covers pretty much everything you need to know about SSAS.

Expert Cube Development with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services – There’s one book that is universally hailed as the “experts’” book, and this is it. Be warned, this is not a beginners book. Don’t try to tackle this until you’ve had at least a little SSAS experience. But it should definitely be on your “must buy” list at some point.

Blogs

Devin Knight – My coworker Devin posts about all aspects of SQL Server BI, but his SSAS posts are ones I often refer back to, or refer others to, when learning SSAS concepts.

Marco Russo – Marco’s blog is a great source of in depth SSAS content. He’s also one a co-author of the “Expect Cube. . .” book listed above.

SSAS Info – This last link isn’t exactly a blog, but more like a blog aggregation site. It’s very useful though, and should be on your list of regularly read sites.

Videos

Pragmatic Works Webinars – On our website we have a big catalog of past webinars (all of which are free to watch), many of which focus on SSIS. 

Pluralsight – Pluralsight has an extensive catalog of courses, including some great SSAS content by Stacia Misner. It’s subscription bases so there is a modest fee (starts at $29 US per month last I checked) but well worth it for the training you can get. There’s also a free trial.

SQL Share – This site takes a new twist on videos, in that each video is very short and very focused on one specific task. 

 

For a quick link direct to this post, you can use http://bit.ly/arcanessas 

Using TFS2010 with Visual Studio / BIDS 2008 and SQL Server Management Studio

When I come to a customer site, I often have to help them get setup with TFS (Team Foundation Server) 2010, Microsoft’s source code control / ALM (application lifecycle management) system. This is so they can work with their BIDS (Business Intelligence Developer Studio) projects as a team, giving the added benefit of source code control. I’ve had to do this often enough I wanted to record the steps for my own use, and hopefully others too.

Installing the TFS 2010 tools for Visual Studio / BIDS 2008

First off, thanks to Derek Miller for covering most of the steps involved in his blog post http://derekjmiller62.wordpress.com/2010/10/19/using-tfs-2010-with-bids-2008/. I won’t go into the detail he did, but will summarize into these basic steps.

1. If you haven’t installed Visual Studio 2008 Service Pack 1, do so by downloading it and installing.

2. Next, you will need to install the Visual Studio 2008 Team Explorer.

3. After installing Team Explorer, you will have to go back and reinstall VS SP1 (from step 1). Don’t skip this step! Team explorer has some older components that overwrite the SP1 components, and you will have reinstall them.

Now this next part I really haven’t seen anywhere else and was a real pain to find, and thus is the main reason for this post. During the SP1 install, we often see “Visual Studio SP1 Installation Failed”. Checking the error log, buried deep you will find “Returning IDOK. INSTALLMESSAGE_ERROR [Error 2902. An internal error has occurred. …”

When you see this, go to your Control Panel, and then to Add Remove Programs. Look for a program called “Microsoft Visual Studio Web Authoring Component” and uninstall it. This is actually installed as part of the Office suite, and you don’t really need it since you likely have much more powerful web authoring tools, or since you are doing BI development won’t be doing an web development in Microsoft Office.

After uninstalling it, SP1 should then install, and you are ready for step 4.

4. Install the Visual Studio Team System 2008 SP1 Forward Compatibility Update for Team Foundation Server 2010. That probably took you longer to read than it actually will to install. After installing, it may prompt you to reboot. Even if it doesn’t ask you should reboot anyway, we’ve seen a few times when we weren’t able to connect until we rebooted.

After that you should be able to go into Visual Studio and go to Tools, Connect to Team Foundation Server. If you still have problems connecting, I will refer you to Derek’s post where he describes some registry entries you can try. So far we haven’t found them necessary, but you may.

Installing the TFS 2010 Tools

Note that there is one big limitation to using TFS 2010 with VS2008. You can connect to a TFS site and upload your solutions and projects, but you can’t create a new team site with VS2008. To do so, you will need the VS2010 shell with the TFS components, a free download.

Installing TFS 2010 for SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)

Now that you have BIDS all setup to work with TFS, it only makes sense to make your SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) also work with TFS. Joseph Jun has a great blog post that goes into all the nitty gritty of how to do this. The short version though, is after you install the TFS 2010 tools in the step above (and they are a prerequisite) you need to install the Team Foundation Server MSSCCI Provider 2010.

After the install, you should see a new Source Control menu option under the File menu in SSMS. From here you can launch the TFS 2010 management shell or open an existing SSMS project / solution. If you have a solution you need to add, simply right click on the solution in the Solution Explorer window and pick Add to Source Control.

Visual Studio Database Projects

Note that if you are using Visual Studio Database Projects, any SQL Server 2008R2 development must be done in Visual Studio 2010. VS2010 is already setup to talk to TFS 2010. If you are using VS 2008 database projects to build a SQL Server 2008 (non-R2) database, then with the steps above you should be good to go for checking in your database project into TFS.

And away we go!

And with that you should be setup to manage your BI Development in Team Foundation Server 2010. It’s a lot of work, but well worth the effort. Using TFS will let your BI staff work as a team to develop projects. Additionally you have the benefit of source code control, something invaluable in the case of package corruptions or needing to track history.

BI Documenter

When I came to work for Pragmatic Works, I was naturally given the opportunity to use their (well our now) tools. Of all of them I think BI Documenter is my favorite. Boy is this thing complete.

Of course, like some of the other SQL Server documentation packages it will do a great job of reverse engineering an existing relational database. BI Documenter will output either HTML or a compiled help file (CHM) file. It places your database structure into a drill down tree, with all the expected bits and pieces. Tables, columns, stored procedures, functions, all with the code needed to create it.

It doesn’t stop there though. Got Analysis Services? Not a problem. It will generate the same drill down structure that you are used to seeing for a standard SQL Server database. Cubes, Measures, Dimensions, KPIs, Calculations, complete with all the meta data and MDX you could ever want.

Of all the features though, the absolute coolest is it’s support for Integration Services. You can point it at either your SSIS server, or to a file store, or just to the directory with your solution. Here’s a sample that uses the package from my Intro to SSIS presentation:

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Not only does it provide detailed info (it appears below the pic) but it will also reproduce the graphical flow! And if that wasn’t cool enough, you can drill down into the other executable parts, such as the data flow.

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Here’s a small sample of the details:

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It doesn’t stop there either, providing complete support for SSRS as well. Just point it at your Reporting Services server and away it’ll go!

Now, I realize this sounds a lot like a commercial, and since I now work for Pragmatic Works probably more so. Bu I just think this is an awesomely cool product, I can think of a lot of uses for it too. Providing turn over documentation, running it weekly to create version snapshots so you can track changes to your SQL Server, providing reference material for developers, and probably a zillion other things I haven’t thought of. (If you have thought of some, by all means leave a comment, would love to hear how YOU are using this.)

I’m sure I’m not doing the product justification, so if you want to see some video demos head on over to http://pragmaticworks.com/ for more info. And again, I apologize if this sounds like a commercial but I am blown away by how cool this product is so I just had to share.

 

 

 

Disclaimer: I do work for Pragmatic Works, and received my copy of this really cool software as a result of my employment.

Data Warehousing / Business Intelligence at Pluralsight

It’s been another busy month, and I’m pleased to announce my two newest modules were published today on Pluralsight. If you’re not familiar with Pluralsight, they are a training company that has a vast library of training videos.

The description of my new course can be found here:

http://www.pluralsight-training.net/microsoft/olt/Course/Toc.aspx?n=intro-dwbi-course

There are two modules, the first is an introductory session for DW/BI. It’s primarily slides, by the end you’ll have a grasp on the arcane terms around Business Intelligence such as facts, dimensions, surrogate keys, OLAP, and more.

The second module is an overview of the Microsoft tools for doing DW/BI. It starts with the Adventure Works Lite database. From there a data warehouse is built, on top of which an analysis services cube is created. Finally a report will be generated off the cube that meets a specific business need.

Along the way attendees will get to see Visual Studio 2010 Database Projects, along with the SQL Server toolkit: SQL Server Integration Services, SQL Server Analysis Services, and SQL Server Reporting Services. Attendees will also get a look at SQL Server Management Studio.

Enjoy!

Pragmatic Works Free SQL Server Training

Just wanted to mention the Pragmatic Works company did a week of free webinars. You can view all of these which cover a wide variety of subjects. The sessions include:

  • Introduction to Managing a SQL Server Database by Jorge Segarra
  • Beginning T-SQL by Patrick LeBlanc
  • The Modern Resume: Building Your Brand by Brian Knight
  • How to Become An Exceptional DBA by Brad McGehee
  • Fundamentals of SSIS by Brian Knight
  • 0 to Cube in 60 Minutes (SSAS) by Brian Knight
  • Trouble Shooting SQL Server by Christian Bolton
  • Introduction to SQL Server Reporting Services by Devin Knight

To get access to the seminars, simply go to:

http://www.pragmaticworks.com/resources/webinars/February2010Webinar.aspx

Alabama Code Camp Mobile 2010

Last Saturday was the Alabama Code Camp, held in Mobile AL. For those unfamiliar with the Alabama Code Camps, we hold on average two a year, and they shift from city to city with different user groups acting as the host group. Other cities include Huntsville, Birmingham, and Montgomery. This time though the Lower Alabama Dot Net User Group under the leadership of Ryan Duclos hosted, and what a great event it was. Everything ran smoothly, there was plenty of drinks and pizza to go around, and some good swag to boot. A big congrats to Ryan and his team of volunteers for a great event, also thanks to Microsoft for sponsoring and the University of South Alabama for the venue.

I was kept busy at this code camp, doing three sessions. The first session was “Introduction to Microsoft PowerPivot”. The slide deck can be found at http://arcanecode.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/powerpivot_long.pdf. To see all my PowerPivot posts, simply pick it in the categories to the right or use this link: http://arcanecode.com/category/powerpivot/.

My second session was on Full Text Searching. You can find code samples and the PDF for the presentation at my code gallery site, http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/SqlServerFTS.

The final presentation was an introduction to Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing. Here is the link to the presentations slides in PDF format. As promised in the session I added the additional information for the Kimball Group book.

A quick apology for my delay in posting, a nasty head cold has had me in Zombie land since I got back. Thanks to all who attended, I appreciate you being very interactive, lots of questions, and very attentive. I look forward to the next time Mobile hosts the Alabama Code Camp.

Introducing Microsoft PowerPivot

What is PowerPivot? Well according to Microsoft:

“PowerPivot is Microsoft Self-Service Business Intelligence”

I can see from the glazed looks you are giving your monitor that was clear as mud. So let’s step back a bit and first define what exactly is Business Intelligence.

Business Intelligence

Business Intelligence, often referred to as simply “BI”, is all about taking data you already have and making sense of it. Being able to take that information and turn it from a raw jumble of individual facts and transform it into knowledge that you can take informed actions on.

In every organization there is already someone who is doing BI, although they may not realize it. Microsoft (and many IT departments) refer to this person as “that guy”. A power user, who grabs data from anyplace he (or she) can get it, then uses tools like Excel or Access to slice it, dice it, and analyze it. This person might be an actual Business Analyst, but more often it’s someone for who BI is not their main job. Some common examples of people doing their own BI today are production managers, accountants, engineers, or sales managers, all who need information to better do their job. Let’s look at an illustration that will make it a bit clearer.

In this example, put yourself in the role of a sales manager. You have gotten IT to extract all of your sales orders for the last several years into an Excel spreadsheet. In order to determine how well your sales people are doing, you need to measure their performance. You’ve decided that the amount sold will be a good measure, and use Excel to give you totals.

IntroEx01

In BI terms, the column “Total Sales” is known as a measure, or sometimes a fact, as it measures something, in this case the sales amount. The grand total sales amount is often called an aggregation, as it totals up the individual rows of data that IT gave us. But now you might be wondering why Andy’s sales are so low? Well, now you want to dig deeper and look at sales by year.

IntroEx02

In BI terms, the names of the sales people are a dimension. Dimensions are often either a “who” (who sold stuff) or a “what” (what stuff did we sell). Places (where was it sold) and dates (when was it sold) are also common dimensions. In this case the sales dates across the top (2007, 2008, 2009) are a date dimension. When we use two or more dimensions to look at our measures, we have a pivot table.

Now we can see a picture emerging. It’s obvious that Andy must have been hired as a new salesperson in late 2008, since he shows no sales for 2007 and very small amount in 2008. But for Paul and Kimberly we can look at something called trends in the BI world. Kimberly shows a nice even trend, rising slowly over the last three years and earns a gold star as our top performer.

By being able to drill down into our data, we spot another trend that was not readily obvious when just looking at the grand totals. Paul has been trending downward so fast the speed of light looks slow. Clearly then we now have information to take action on, commonly known as actionable intelligence.

So remind me, why do we need PowerPivot?

As you can see in the above example, “that guy” in your company clearly has a need to look at this data in order to do his job. Not only does he need to review it, he also has the issue of how to share this information with his co-workers. Unfortunately in the past the tools available to “that guy” have had some drawbacks. The two main tools used by our analyst have been either Excel, or a complete BI solution involving a data warehouse and SQL Server Analysis Services.

Excel’s main limitations center around the volume of data needed to do good analysis. Excel has limits to the number of rows it can store, and for large datasets a spreadsheet can consume equally large amounts of disk space. This makes the spreadsheet difficult to share with coworkers. In addition mathematical functions like aggregations could be slow. On the good side, Excel is readily available to most workers, and a solution can be put together fairly quickly.

A full blown BI solution has some major benefits over the Excel solution. A data warehouse is created, and then SQL Server Analysis Services (often abbreviated as SSAS) is used to precalculate aggregations for every possible way an analyst might wish to look at them. The data is then very easy to share via tools like Excel and SQL Server Reporting Services. While very robust and powerful solution, it does have some drawbacks. It can take quite a bit of time to design, code, and implement both the data warehouse and the analysis services pieces of the solution. In addition it can also be expensive for IT to implement such a system.

Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, it’s PowerPivot!

PowerPivot combines the best of both worlds. In fact, it’s not one tool but two: PowerPivot for Microsoft Excel 2010, and PowerPivot for SharePoint 2010. What’s the difference you ask? Good question.

PowerPivot for Microsoft Excel 2010

PowerPivot acts as an Add-on for Excel 2010, and in many ways is quite revolutionary. First, it brings the full power of SQL Server Analysis Services right into Excel. All of the speed and power of SSAS is available right on your desktop. Second, it uses a compression technology that allows vast amounts of data to be saved in a minimal amount of space. Millions of rows of data can now be stored, sorted, and aggregated in a reasonable amount of disk space with great speed.

PowerPivot can draw its data from a wide variety of sources. As you might expect, it can pull from almost any database. Additionally it can draw data from news feeds, SQL Server Reporting Services, other Excel sheets, it can even be typed in manually if need be.

Another issue that often faces the business analyst is the freshness of the data. The information is only as good as the date it was last imported into Excel. Traditionally “that guy” only got extracts of the database as IT had time, since it was often a time consuming process. PowerPivot addresses this through its linked tables feature. PowerPivot will remember where your data came from, and with one simple button click can refresh the spreadsheet with the latest information.

Because PowerPivot sits inside Microsoft Excel, it not only can create basic pivot tables but has all the full featured functionality of Excel at its disposal. It can format pivot tables in a wide array of styles, create pivot charts and graphs, and combine these together into useful dashboards. Additionally PowerPivot has a rich set of mathematical functionally, combining the existing functions already in Excel with an additional set of functions called Data Analysis eXpressions or DAX.

PowerPivot for SharePoint 2010

PowerPivot for Excel 2010 clearly solves several issues around the issue of analysis. It allows users to quickly create spreadsheets, pivot tables, charts, and more in a compact amount of space. If you recall though, creation was only half of “that guys” problem. The other half was sharing his analysis with the rest of his organization. That’s where PowerPivot for SharePoint 2010 comes into play.

Placing a PowerPivot Excel workbook in SharePoint 2010 not only enables traditional file sharing, but also activates several additional features. First, the spreadsheet is hosted right in the web browser. Thus users who might not have made the transition to Excel 2010 can still use the PowerPivot created workbook, slicing and filtering the data to get the information they require.

Data can also be refreshed on an automated, scheduled basis. This ensures the data is always up to date when doing analysis. Dashboards can also be created from the contents of a worksheet and displayed in SharePoint. Finally these PowerPivot created worksheets can be used as data sources for such tools as SQL Server Reporting Services.

Limitations

First, let me preface this by saying as of this writing all of the components are either in CTP (Community Technology Preview, a pre-beta) or Beta state. Thus there could be some changes between now and their final release next year.

To use the PowerPivot for Excel 2010 components, all you have to have is Excel 2010 and the PowerPivot add-in. If you want to share the workbook and get all the rich functionality SharePoint has to offer, you’ll have to have SharePoint 2010, running Excel Services and PowerPivot 2010 Services. You’ll also have to have SQL Server 2008 R2 Analysis Services running on the SharePoint 2010 box. Since you’ll have to have a SQL Server instance installed to support SharePoint this is not a huge limitation, especially since SSAS comes with SQL Server at no extra cost.

One thing I wish to make clear, SharePoint 2010 itself can run using any version of SQL Server from SQL Server 2005 on. It is the PowerPivot service that requires 2008 R2 Analysis Services.

One other important item to note: at some point the load upon the SharePoint 2010 server may grow too large if especially complex analysis is being done. Fortunately SharePoint 2010 ships with several tools that allow administrators to monitor the load and plan accordingly. At the point where the load is too big, it is a clear indication it’s time to transition from a PowerPivot solution to a full BI solution using a data warehouse and SQL Server Analysis Services.

What does PowerPivot mean for business users?

For business users, and especially “that guy”, it means complex analysis tools can be created in a short amount of time. Rich functionality makes it easier to spot trends and produce meaningful charts and graphs. It also means this information can be shared with others in the organization easily, without imposing large burdens on the corporate e-mail system or local file sharing mechanisms.

No longer will users be dependent on IT for their analysis, they will have the power to create everything they need on their own, truly bringing “self service BI” to fruition.

What does PowerPivot mean for Business Intelligence IT Pros?

The first reaction many BI developers have when hearing about PowerPivot is “oh no, this is going to put me out of a job!” Far from it, I firmly believe PowerPivot will create even more work for BI Professionals like myself.

As upper management grows to rely on the information provided by PowerPivot, they will also begin to understand the true value BI can bring to an organization. Selling a new BI solution into an organization where none currently exists can be difficult, as it can be hard to visualize how such a solution would work and the value it brings. PowerPivot allows BI functionality to be brought into an organization at a low development cost, proving the value of BI with minimal investment. Thus when there is a need to implement a larger, traditional BI project those same managers will be more forthcoming with the dollars.

Second, as users pull more and more data, they are going to want that data better organized than they will find in their current transactional business systems. This will in turn spur the need to create many new data warehouses. Likewise the IT department will also want data warehouses created, to reduce the load placed on those same transactional business systems.

I also foresee PowerPivot being used by BI Pros themselves to create solutions. The database structure of many transactional database systems can be difficult to understand even for experienced IT people, much less users. BI Pros can use PowerPivot to add a layer of abstraction between the database and the users, allowing business analysts to do their job without having to learn the complexity of a database system.

BI Pros can also use PowerPivot to implement quick turnaround solutions for customers, bringing more value for the customer’s dollar. When a BI Pro can prove him (or her) self by providing rich functionality in a short time frame it’s almost always the case they are brought back in for multiple engagements.

PowerPivot also provides great value to BI Pros who are employed full time in an enterprise organization. They can create solutions much quicker than before, freeing them up to do other valuable tasks. In addition PowerPivot solutions can provide a “stop gap” solution, pushing the date at which the organization needs to spend the dollars for a full blown BI solution and allowing IT to plan better.

Finally I see great value in PowerPivot as a prototyping tool for larger BI projects. Now users can see their data, interact with it, analyze it, and ensure the required measures and dimensions are present before proceeding with the larger project.

I’ll reiterate, if anything I believe PowerPivot will create an explosion of work for the Business Intelligence Professional.

Where can I learn more?

Well right here for one. I have become quite interested in PowerPivot since seeing it at the SQL PASS 2009 Summit. I think it will be a valuable tool for both myself and my customers. This will be the first of many blog posts to come on PowerPivot. I am also beginning a series of presentations on PowerPivot for local user groups and code camp events. The first will be Saturday, November 21st 2009 at the SharePoint Saturday in Birmingham Alabama, but there will be many more to come. (If you’d like me to come speak at your group just shoot me an e-mail and we’ll see what we can arrange.)

There’s also the PowerPivot site itself:

I’ve also found a small handful of blogs on PowerPivot, listed in no particular order:

Summary

Thanks for sticking with me, I know this was a rather long blog post but PowerPivot has a lot of rich functionality to offer. While PowerPivot is still in the CTP/Beta stage as of this writing, I see more and more interest in the community, which will continue to grow as PowerPivot moves closer to release. I hope this post has set you off on the right step and you’ll continue to come back for more information.

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