SharePoint BI (Business Intelligence) Training Resources

SharePoint is a huge topic unto itself, so I wanted to provide some links that focus on learning how to use SharePoint in the context of Business Intelligence. 

A quick disclaimer, some of the links below are by co-workers or other people I have an affiliation with, financial or otherwise. That’s because I’m lucky enough to work with some of the best people in the field. Also, in the case of the books I’ve linked to the Kindle version where possible, mostly because I’m a Kindle junkie. There are paper versions of the books, and you are free to buy from your favorite retailer.

Books

SharePoint 2010 Business Intelligence 24 hour Trainer – This is a really cool book, in that it’s not just a book. It comes with a DVD loaded with video lessons on how to use the various tools in SharePoint for doing BI. This is the first book to buy if you are new to doing BI in SharePoint.

Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2010 – This is a great book which provides an introduction to all of the BI Services available within SharePoint 2010.

Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Business Intelligence Unleashed – Like most of the books in the “Unleashed” series, this takes a much deeper dive into the tools than the previous two books. A good choice once you are ready to move beyond the beginner stage.

Blogs

There aren’t many blogs that focus solely on SharePoint for BI, so I’ve picked out two sites that have a lot of SharePoint for BI content on them.

Data Inspirations -  This blog focuses on all aspects of BI, one of the lead bloggers is Stacia Misner, co-author of the BI in Microsoft SharePoint 2010 book listed above.

BIDN – Many experts in the BI field, myself included, contribute to the Business Intelligence Developer Network. Here you’ll find a wide variety of topics in the BI field, including many on SharePoint BI.

Videos

Pragmatic Works Webinars – On our website we have a big catalog of past webinars (all of which are free to watch), many of which focus on PowerPivot.

Pluralsight – Pluralsight has an extensive catalog of other courses you can pick from. It’s subscription bases so there is a modest fee (starts at $29 US per month last I checked) but well worth it for the training you can get. There’s also a free trial.

For a quick link direct to this post, you can use http://bit.ly/arcanespbi

Task Factory–SharePoint Destination

In a previous video we looked at the SharePoint Source component, one of the many components in Pragmatic Works Task Factory suite of SSIS tools. We saw how easy it was to extract data out of a SharePoint list.

What though, do we do if we need to push data into a SharePoint list? It turns out it’s every bit as easy, using Task Factory’s SharePoint Destination component.

SharePoint Saturday Huntsville

It’s another Saturday, must be time for another speaking engagement. Today I’m in Huntsville Alabama speaking at their SharePoint Saturday. Now you may wonder what a SQL BI guy is doing at a SharePoint event. There are two kinds of BI professionals in the world, those who are currently working with SharePoint and those who will be working with SharePoint. I believe the converse could also be said for SharePoint people. There those who are currently hosting BI solutions, and those who will be hosting BI solutions. It’s important then, that SharePoint professionals have a clear understanding of what business intelligence is, including all the terms that get used in the BI world. In addition SharePoint 2010 contains features to support a new tool called PowerPivot. Understanding what a PowerPivot workbook is, and how their customers will be using it will give SharePoint professionals better understanding of how to host PowerPivot content.

My first session of the day is entitled “Off and Running With PowerPivot for Excel 2010″. In this session I’ll be giving an overview of PowerPivot, then we’ll be looking at how to import and manipulate data within Excel. This presentation is demo heavy but there are a few slides which can be downloaded from this link.

In my second presentation we’ll dig into the guts of data warehousing and business intelligence. Business Intelligence has its own vocabulary, during the session the audience will learn all the buzzwords around BI and dig into the data warehouse to see how these terms are implemented. This particular presentation is a slide heavy deck, unlike my previous session there is little in the way of demonstrations. We’ll briefly touch on SharePoint, understand though that this presentation centered largely around understanding what BI is so you’ll understand what your SharePoint system is being used for. The slides are available from this link.

If you are reading this after the fact, then let me thank you for coming to my presentations. I hope you found them useful, please don’t hesitate to contact me if I can be of further assistance.

Alabama Code Camp Mobile 2010

Last Saturday was the Alabama Code Camp, held in Mobile AL. For those unfamiliar with the Alabama Code Camps, we hold on average two a year, and they shift from city to city with different user groups acting as the host group. Other cities include Huntsville, Birmingham, and Montgomery. This time though the Lower Alabama Dot Net User Group under the leadership of Ryan Duclos hosted, and what a great event it was. Everything ran smoothly, there was plenty of drinks and pizza to go around, and some good swag to boot. A big congrats to Ryan and his team of volunteers for a great event, also thanks to Microsoft for sponsoring and the University of South Alabama for the venue.

I was kept busy at this code camp, doing three sessions. The first session was “Introduction to Microsoft PowerPivot”. The slide deck can be found at http://arcanecode.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/powerpivot_long.pdf. To see all my PowerPivot posts, simply pick it in the categories to the right or use this link: http://arcanecode.com/category/powerpivot/.

My second session was on Full Text Searching. You can find code samples and the PDF for the presentation at my code gallery site, http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/SqlServerFTS.

The final presentation was an introduction to Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing. Here is the link to the presentations slides in PDF format. As promised in the session I added the additional information for the Kimball Group book.

A quick apology for my delay in posting, a nasty head cold has had me in Zombie land since I got back. Thanks to all who attended, I appreciate you being very interactive, lots of questions, and very attentive. I look forward to the next time Mobile hosts the Alabama Code Camp.

PowerPivot for Excel 2010 at the Steel City SQL Users Group January 19, 2009

Today I am at the Steel City SQL Users Group, presenting on Microsoft’s newest BI Tool, PowerPivot.

The slide deck for this meeting can be found at:

http://arcanecode.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/powerpivot_long.pdf

To see all my posts so far on PowerPivot, you can use the link below to filter.

http://arcanecode.com/category/powerpivot/

Thanks for coming!

Import Filters in PowerPivot

PowerPivot has the ability to import millions of rows of data into Excel 2010 for purposes of analyzing, slicing and dicing. However, even though you can import vast amounts of data you may not always want to. There are many reasons for this.

You may wish to limit the amount of data for security reasons. Perhaps bringing in all of the data may put an unneeded strain on the server. Most likely though, is you simply do not need all of the data. As an analyst you may be interested in only the data for a segment of your organization, such as a single plant or department.

Fortunately filtering data is an easy task. If you are not familiar with importing data into PowerPivot, may I suggest you first review my step by step posted yesterday.

Launch Excel 2010 and go to the PowerPivot tab, then launch the PowerPivot window. Select the "From Database" to start the import process, and for this example we’ll use SQL Server. Now, like in my previous blog post enter your credentials to connect to a SQL Server. For this example we’ll just pick one table, SalesOrderDetail from the AdventureWorksLT2008 database.

With the SalesOrderDetail picked, look in the lower right side of the dialog. You will see a button labeled "Preview & Filter".

clip_image001

When you click that button you should see a new dialog appear.

clip_image002

Here you can see a subset of your data, only the first few rows. It’s enough to give you an idea of what the data looks like, but it won’t show you every single row. Considering the fact that PowerPivot is capable of importing millions of rows, this is probably a good thing.

Within this dialog we can do some pretty powerful things. Let’s start by eliminating a column we don’t need in the data we want to import. Scroll to the right until you see the rowguid column and uncheck the box next to the column header, as you see below.

clip_image003

By unchecking this box this column will not be imported into our Excel 2010 PowerPivot table.

Recall though that the name of this dialog was Preview & Filter. We can also do some review of our data to ensure it’s what we want. Let’s say we want to look to see the range of values for our line totals. Click the downward facing triangle button to the right of the LineTotal column header. A drop down menu will appear. Select "Sort Smallest to Largest"

clip_image004

Scrolling through the data you’ll notice that the data has indeed been sorted. Also note the menu icon to the right of the column name changes to indicate a sort has been applied to this column. (Remember though it’s not showing all rows, just the first few sorted in order.) An important thing to note tough, this sorting applies only to the data as you see it in the Preview & Filter area, once you click the Finish button on the Table Import Wizard the sort is removed. While the preview options in this dialog are not saved, filters are. If you had pressed Finished, you’d have seen that rowguid is not included in the result set. But don’t click Finish yet, we’re not quite done filtering.

For our next filter, let’s decide for purposes of this report we are only interested in large orders. We’ll define large as "Line Total greater than 1,000 dollars". Once again open the menu to the right of the LineTotal column header and select "Number Filters". A pop out menu will appear, from it select "Greater Than…"

clip_image005

When the Custom Filter pops up, enter 1000 next to the is greater than box and click OK.

clip_image006

Clicking OK will reveal lesser amounts have been removed. Other filters besides numeric filters are available. For text data, you have "is equal to" and "is not equal to" available. Date filters work the same, having the "is equal to" and "is not equal to" available. I’m hopeful that for date types further functionality will be added in the future, such as date ranges or "is greater/less than" types of functionality.

Let’s click the OK button on the Preview & Filters window to return to the Table Import Wizard. You’ll now see an Applied filters link in the row with the table name, click it to see what filters are in effect.

clip_image007

When you click the link you’ll see:

clip_image008

While you cannot edit this information, it is nice to see it all in one location. Click OK to close and return to the previous window.

Click Finish to complete the import. You will see the data you asked for, only rows with LineTotal greater than 1000 and without the rowguid column.

Hopefully you’ve seen how powerful the filtering tools included with PowerPivot are. Using them you can remove unwanted rows and columns, limiting not only the amount of data you have to pull across the network but that you have to store locally in the PowerPivot Excel 2010 spreadsheet. Limiting your data will ensure only the rows required for the analysis are included, saving time and enhancing security.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 103 other followers