SSAS Training Resources

I’ve been asked to provide links to some useful resources for learning about SQL Server Analysis Services. Below are a list of my favorite blogs, books, and other sites to learn from.

A quick disclaimer, some of the links below are by co-workers or other people I have an affiliation with, financial or otherwise. That’s because I’m lucky enough to work with some of the best people in the field. Also, in the case of the books I’ve linked to the Kindle version where possible, mostly because I’m a Kindle junkie. There are paper versions of the books, and you are free to buy from your favorite retailer.

Books

Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services Step by Step – This is a great beginners book. If you are starting at ground zero, this is the book to start with.

Professional Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services 2008 with MDX – If you are looking for one book that has everything, this is it. It’s a huge book that covers pretty much everything you need to know about SSAS.

Expert Cube Development with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services – There’s one book that is universally hailed as the “experts’” book, and this is it. Be warned, this is not a beginners book. Don’t try to tackle this until you’ve had at least a little SSAS experience. But it should definitely be on your “must buy” list at some point.

Blogs

Devin Knight – My coworker Devin posts about all aspects of SQL Server BI, but his SSAS posts are ones I often refer back to, or refer others to, when learning SSAS concepts.

Marco Russo – Marco’s blog is a great source of in depth SSAS content. He’s also one a co-author of the “Expect Cube. . .” book listed above.

SSAS Info – This last link isn’t exactly a blog, but more like a blog aggregation site. It’s very useful though, and should be on your list of regularly read sites.

Videos

Pragmatic Works Webinars – On our website we have a big catalog of past webinars (all of which are free to watch), many of which focus on SSIS. 

Pluralsight – Pluralsight has an extensive catalog of courses, including some great SSAS content by Stacia Misner. It’s subscription bases so there is a modest fee (starts at $29 US per month last I checked) but well worth it for the training you can get. There’s also a free trial.

SQL Share – This site takes a new twist on videos, in that each video is very short and very focused on one specific task. 

 

For a quick link direct to this post, you can use http://bit.ly/arcanessas 

Using TFS2010 with Visual Studio / BIDS 2008 and SQL Server Management Studio

When I come to a customer site, I often have to help them get setup with TFS (Team Foundation Server) 2010, Microsoft’s source code control / ALM (application lifecycle management) system. This is so they can work with their BIDS (Business Intelligence Developer Studio) projects as a team, giving the added benefit of source code control. I’ve had to do this often enough I wanted to record the steps for my own use, and hopefully others too.

Installing the TFS 2010 tools for Visual Studio / BIDS 2008

First off, thanks to Derek Miller for covering most of the steps involved in his blog post http://derekjmiller62.wordpress.com/2010/10/19/using-tfs-2010-with-bids-2008/. I won’t go into the detail he did, but will summarize into these basic steps.

1. If you haven’t installed Visual Studio 2008 Service Pack 1, do so by downloading it and installing.

2. Next, you will need to install the Visual Studio 2008 Team Explorer.

3. After installing Team Explorer, you will have to go back and reinstall VS SP1 (from step 1). Don’t skip this step! Team explorer has some older components that overwrite the SP1 components, and you will have reinstall them.

Now this next part I really haven’t seen anywhere else and was a real pain to find, and thus is the main reason for this post. During the SP1 install, we often see “Visual Studio SP1 Installation Failed”. Checking the error log, buried deep you will find “Returning IDOK. INSTALLMESSAGE_ERROR [Error 2902. An internal error has occurred. …”

When you see this, go to your Control Panel, and then to Add Remove Programs. Look for a program called “Microsoft Visual Studio Web Authoring Component” and uninstall it. This is actually installed as part of the Office suite, and you don’t really need it since you likely have much more powerful web authoring tools, or since you are doing BI development won’t be doing an web development in Microsoft Office.

After uninstalling it, SP1 should then install, and you are ready for step 4.

4. Install the Visual Studio Team System 2008 SP1 Forward Compatibility Update for Team Foundation Server 2010. That probably took you longer to read than it actually will to install. After installing, it may prompt you to reboot. Even if it doesn’t ask you should reboot anyway, we’ve seen a few times when we weren’t able to connect until we rebooted.

After that you should be able to go into Visual Studio and go to Tools, Connect to Team Foundation Server. If you still have problems connecting, I will refer you to Derek’s post where he describes some registry entries you can try. So far we haven’t found them necessary, but you may.

Installing the TFS 2010 Tools

Note that there is one big limitation to using TFS 2010 with VS2008. You can connect to a TFS site and upload your solutions and projects, but you can’t create a new team site with VS2008. To do so, you will need the VS2010 shell with the TFS components, a free download.

Installing TFS 2010 for SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)

Now that you have BIDS all setup to work with TFS, it only makes sense to make your SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) also work with TFS. Joseph Jun has a great blog post that goes into all the nitty gritty of how to do this. The short version though, is after you install the TFS 2010 tools in the step above (and they are a prerequisite) you need to install the Team Foundation Server MSSCCI Provider 2010.

After the install, you should see a new Source Control menu option under the File menu in SSMS. From here you can launch the TFS 2010 management shell or open an existing SSMS project / solution. If you have a solution you need to add, simply right click on the solution in the Solution Explorer window and pick Add to Source Control.

Visual Studio Database Projects

Note that if you are using Visual Studio Database Projects, any SQL Server 2008R2 development must be done in Visual Studio 2010. VS2010 is already setup to talk to TFS 2010. If you are using VS 2008 database projects to build a SQL Server 2008 (non-R2) database, then with the steps above you should be good to go for checking in your database project into TFS.

And away we go!

And with that you should be setup to manage your BI Development in Team Foundation Server 2010. It’s a lot of work, but well worth the effort. Using TFS will let your BI staff work as a team to develop projects. Additionally you have the benefit of source code control, something invaluable in the case of package corruptions or needing to track history.

SSIS Training Resources

I’ve been asked to provide links to some useful resources for learning about SQL Server Integration Services. Below are a list of my favorite blogs, books, and other sites to learn from.

A quick disclaimer, some of the links below are by co-workers or other people I have an affiliation with, financial or otherwise. That’s because I’m lucky enough to work with some of the best people in the field. Also, in the case of the books I’ve linked to the Kindle version where possible, mostly because I’m a Kindle junkie. There are paper versions of the books, and you are free to buy from your favorite retailer.

 

Books

Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Integration Services: Problem, Design, Solution – I’m a big fan of problem / design / solution books. They do a great job of teaching you how to solve real world issues. The chapter by Jessica Moss on package configurations is especially useful, one I refer back to often.

Professional Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Integration Services – This is another of those big thick books (1000+ pages if you decide to lug around the paper version) that covers the gambit of everything you ever wanted to know about SSIS but were afraid to ask.

Knight’s 24-hour Trainer: SQL Server 2008 Integration Services – This is one time where I suggest getting the physical book, as it is accompanied by a DVD full of videos focused on SSIS. They will take you from an absolute beginner and walk you through each of the most used Tasks and Transformations used in SSIS. If you want to get up to speed fast on SSIS this is the book to get.

 

Blogs

Jamie Thomson – Better known as the SSIS Junkie, Jamie posts some really advanced topics on his blog.

Andy Leonard – Andy is a whiz at SSIS, and does a great job at both teaching and consulting.

Christopher Price – A very active blogger on SSIS.

 

Videos

Pragmatic Works Webinars – On our website we have a big catalog of past webinars (all of which are free to watch), many of which focus on SSIS. 

Pluralsight – Pluralsight has an extensive catalog of courses, including an SSIS course. It’s subscription bases so there is a modest fee (starts at $29 US per month last I checked) but well worth it for the training you can get. There’s also a free trial.

SQL Share – This site takes a new twist on videos, in that each video is very short and very focused on one specific task. Lots of good stuff on here on SSIS, much of it by Brian Knight. Free.

 

For a quick link to this post, you can use http://bit.ly/arcanessis.

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